Tag Archives: dairy-free

In, On, Move: A Wellness Series.

My first post in this In, On, Move fortnightly wellness series got crazy-long, so I’m going to break them up in future. Tuesdays will be In (food), Wednesdays On (beauty & personal care), and Thusdays Move (exercise and activity). As always, take what works for you and leave the rest 🙂

In: So my inner self is a five year old who throws tantrums at the slightest hint of deprivation. What, I can’t have dairy?! ALL I WANT is dairy. I have found the best way to deal with this is to keep experimenting with non-dairy imitations of delicious dairy foods, and then once the five year old is distracted digesting her treats, I sneak in lots of vegetables, fruit, and meat. Hence, the peanut butter chocolate milkshake (that contains no peanuts, chocolate, or milk).

Lots of non-dairy healthy smoothie recipes containing avocado and spinach pretend they taste like a regular milkshake. They are frequently delicious, but they are also dirty liars because they do not taste like milkshakes. To me, at least, this one actually does. It is my adaptation of this recipe from Detoxinista.

Ingredients:

– 7 icecubes

– 2 frozen bananas (peel the bananas before you freeze them, otherwise it is a giant pain in the ass to get the peels off).

– 1 to 1 + 1/2 cups of milk. I use almond, but go with your favourite. I use 1 cup if I’m making just for myself, and it comes out thickshake consistency, or 1 + 1/2 if I’m making a serve for me and one for my partner, and it is more regular milkshake thickness.

– 1 tbsp sweetener. I use maple syrup or agave, you could also use coconut sugar, stevia or honey depending on preferences.

– 2 tbsp of nut butter. I use almond when I want a more peanut buttery taste, while cashew gives a creamy texture without affecting the taste too much. If you can have peanuts, try peanut butter. If you can’t eat nuts, I’d try a tbsp or two of coconut oil for a good fat boost and some creaminess.

– 1 tbsp maca powder (optional) + 1 tbsp of cacao powder. I get this in a blend and use both, but if you’re so inclined just use cacao. Try and get cacao rather than cocoa if you can, as cocoa has had most of the nutrients processed out of it. Maca is good for hormone balance but don’t take it if you’re pregnant.

– 1 tbsp lucuma powder (optional). I love this stuff; it can be a bit hard to find, but it has a nutty caramel flavour that’s great with chocolate.

– Pinch of salt (optional, but it helps complement the chocolate flavour of the cacao).

– 1 tsp to 1 tbsp of vanilla essence. I use a tbsp because I love it.

– 1 serve of protein powder (optional). I just started trying a carob-based vegan protein powder, since most contain dairy products, grains, or legumes.

Instructions:

Crush ice. Slice banana. Blend ingredients. That’s it!

I have had this for breakfast every day for a week and I’m still not sick of it, plus it’s a solid energy and nutrient hit. Let me know if you try it!

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Link Round-Up.

Happy Easter to those celebrating, and happy long weekend to everyone else!

I decided to ignore my normal no dairy, grains, or soy rules for Easter and just eat what I wanted. It was delicious, but I feel pretty disgusting now; fatigued and moody with a pretty distressed digestive system. In a way, I think it’s good for me to fall off the wagon every so often, because it reaffirms how much better I feel normally, and that what I am usually doing is the right thing for my body.

So in case anyone else is in a chocolate-induced cloud of bleurgh, here are some distractions!

A piece from Laurie Edwards on the differences in medication efficacy between genders, the higher incidence of women with chronic pain, and the impact of these issues on equitable treatment. I know I post a lot of links on gender disparity in chronic pain, but it’s an issue that keeps popping up in my dissertation research and one I’m passionately interested in.

If you are one of the lucky ladies (or gents!) on steroids for autoimmune disease, you’re likely dealing with a whole host of sucky side effects. This article has some suggestions for how to combat one of them – dry skin.

Michelle at Living with Bob wrote this wonderful post on dealing with the all-too-frequent criticisms that seem to permeate the lives of individuals living with health issues. How many times have we all heard, “You just need to x, y, and z! You’re not trying hard enough!”? I think the perspective shift she discusses is essential.

Amanda at Celiac and Allergy Adventures has some great ideas for identifying and coping with social situations in which food allergies or intolerances may be an issue. I don’t handle gluten, dairy, or soy well, but tend to feel uncomfortable requesting special accommodations, so I usually just don’t eat or eat it anyway and then leave suddenly when I make myself sick. I know this is ridiculous and I’m working on being assertive!

A chronic pain topic I think is incredibly important and not talked about enough; Tracy from Oh What a Pain in the… discusses some difficulties and potential solutions around having sex when you have chronic pain. A friend who did a multidisciplinary pain treatment had a fellow classmate come up to her and quietly ask her if she had any difficulties in this area. This poor lady was suffering and didn’t feel like she could discuss it with her doctors or bring it up openly in class even though it was severely affecting her marriage and quality of life. This breaks my heart. Sex is important to our health and we should talk about it!

Is there anything you’ve written or come across that you think I should know about? Let me know!