Link Round-Up.

Also a little late this week, but a few things that have caught my eye recently in between journal articles:

http://www.alexandrafranzen.com/2013/02/03/how-to-say-no-to-everything-ever/

Sometimes saying ‘no’ is vital to our health – most chronically ill people I know have had to scale back significantly on commitments – but it can be really hard! This is a great formula for doing so kindly.

http://www.sarahwilson.com.au/2013/02/things-feeling-shit-full-its-ok/

An important reminder to keep digging when things are less-than-awesome.

http://www.aaup.org/article/chronic-illness-and-academic-career#.UR

Notes on being chronically ill in the academic sphere. While focused on academic staff, many of these issues also apply to students, and I’ve encountered difficulty with some of them, such as brain fog or fatigue being perceived as a lack of intelligence or motivation. My tertiary education has been a continuous struggle between being accorded accommodations I require for success without destroying my health, and the fear of being perceived as stupid and/or lazy.

http://www.xojane.com/it-happened-to-me/cluster-headaches

A personal account of living with chronic pain in the form of cluster headaches; a lot of the points in this resonated with me. Cluster headaches were one of my initial diagnoses when I started getting occipital neuralgia; I was glad it turned out to be wrong!

http://www.xojane.com/beauty/beauty-as-medication-its-an-effort-but-i-put-on-make-up-today

I liked this piece from a young woman with Crohn’s disease on getting dressed and made up to make yourself feel better when you’re sick. Putting on makeup (or even brushing my hair or showering) can be so hard when you’re fighting massive fatigue and pain, but if I can muster the effort to put myself together it usually does help, even if I’m the only one that sees it. Then again, I get anxious when my regrowth and eyebrows look bad (and it always happens at the same time!), so maybe that’s just me.

http://www.slate.com/blogs/quora/2013/01/14/medicine_and_hospitals_a_doctor_s_advice_for_being_admitted_to_a_hospital.html

Some aspects of taking care of yourself in hospital that wouldn’t have occurred to me as a patient, but certainly could be valuable, particularly for hospital ‘frequent fliers’.

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